Oxford visit Bedford Boys Tribute Center

Newly elected American Legion National Commander James W. (Bill) Oxford paid a visit to the Bedford Boys Tribute Center on Wednesday last week as part of tour he’s making around the country.

American Legion National Commander James W. (Bill) Oxford, who was just recently elected paid a visit to the Bedford Boys Tribute Center on Wednesday, Sept. 4 as part of a tour throughout the country, starting with Virginia.

“Part of my responsibility is to visit our 55 departments,” Oxford said. “Virginia is the first stop of my tour of the departments of the American Legion.”

The American Legion was chartered and incorporated by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization devoted to mutual helpfulness. It is the nation’s largest wartime veterans service organization, committed to mentoring youth and sponsorship of wholesome programs in communities, advocating patriotism and honor, promoting strong national security, and continued devotion to fellow service members and veterans.

Hundreds of local American Legion programs and activities strengthen the nation one community at a time. American Legion Baseball is one of the nation’s most successful amateur athletic programs, educating young people about the importance of sportsmanship, citizenship and fitness.

The Operation Comfort Warriors program supports recovering wounded warriors and their families, providing them with "comfort items" and the kind of support that makes a hospital feel a little bit more like home. The Legion also raises millions of dollars in donations at the local, state and national levels to help veterans and their families during times of need and to provide college scholarship opportunities.
“Everything we saw today fit right in with those programs,” Oxford said. “Supporting these historical documents and providing these historical reference is a way to protect history by providing it and making it available for the next generation.”

Some of Oxfords stops following Bedford included Lynchburg and Norfolk and then after leaving Virginia, he continued on to Tennessee and Missouri.

“It’s a hopscotch around the country for the next year for me,” Oxford said.

According to Oxford, The American Legion this year is celebrating its 100th anniversary, which started at the National Convention and goes through Veterans Day this year. The American Legion has posts that are considered “centennial" posts because they were chartered in 1919 when the organization was founded. Bedford is a centennial post.

“The architects here created the symbols, statutes and columns,” Oxford said. “All of those things seem to tie together to create a relationship. The people in Bedford have taken this as one of their projects and made it their own. It’s all local and that’s the biggest thing about it.”

The American Legion is a nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization with great political influence perpetuated by its grass-roots involvement in the legislation process from local districts to Capitol Hill. Legionnaires’ sense of obligation to community, state and nation drives an honest advocacy for veterans in Washington. The Legion stands behind the issues most important to the nation's veterans community, backed by resolutions passed by volunteer leadership.

Oxford extended the invitation to join The American Legion to any veteran who has served since Dec. 7, 1941 because they are now eligible to do so. Anyone interested can visit legion.org.

“I’d like to invite any one of those veterans to come join us,” Oxford said. “We’d be happy to bring them on board, show them ropes and what the legion is about and I hope they’d be interested in joining our ranks.”

American Legion National Commander James W. (Bill) Oxford, who was just recently elected paid a visit to the Bedford Boys Tribute Center on Wednesday, Sept. 4 as part of a tour throughout the country, starting with Virginia.

“Part of my responsibility is to visit our 55 departments,” Oxford said. “Virginia is the first stop of my tour of the departments of the American Legion.”

The American Legion was chartered and incorporated by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization devoted to mutual helpfulness. It is the nation’s largest wartime veterans service organization, committed to mentoring youth and sponsorship of wholesome programs in communities, advocating patriotism and honor, promoting strong national security, and continued devotion to fellow service members and veterans.

Hundreds of local American Legion programs and activities strengthen the nation one community at a time. American Legion Baseball is one of the nation’s most successful amateur athletic programs, educating young people about the importance of sportsmanship, citizenship and fitness.

The Operation Comfort Warriors program supports recovering wounded warriors and their families, providing them with "comfort items" and the kind of support that makes a hospital feel a little bit more like home. The Legion also raises millions of dollars in donations at the local, state and national levels to help veterans and their families during times of need and to provide college scholarship opportunities.
“Everything we saw today fit right in with those programs,” Oxford said. “Supporting these historical documents and providing these historical reference is a way to protect history by providing it and making it available for the next generation.”

Some of Oxfords stops following Bedford included Lynchburg and Norfolk and then after leaving Virginia, he continued on to Tennessee and Missouri.

“It’s a hopscotch around the country for the next year for me,” Oxford said.

According to Oxford, The American Legion this year is celebrating its 100th anniversary, which started at the National Convention and goes through Veterans Day this year. The American Legion has posts that are considered “centennial" posts because they were chartered in 1919 when the organization was founded. Bedford is a centennial post.

“The architects here created the symbols, statutes and columns,” Oxford said. “All of those things seem to tie together to create a relationship. The people in Bedford have taken this as one of their projects and made it their own. It’s all local and that’s the biggest thing about it.”

The American Legion is a nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization with great political influence perpetuated by its grass-roots involvement in the legislation process from local districts to Capitol Hill. Legionnaires’ sense of obligation to community, state and nation drives an honest advocacy for veterans in Washington. The Legion stands behind the issues most important to the nation's veterans community, backed by resolutions passed by volunteer leadership.

Oxford extended the invitation to join The American Legion to any veteran who has served since Dec. 7, 1941 because they are now eligible to do so. Anyone interested can visit legion.org.

“I’d like to invite any one of those veterans to come join us,” Oxford said. “We’d be happy to bring them on board, show them ropes and what the legion is about and I hope they’d be interested in joining our ranks.”

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