Employees from Appalachian Power visited about 420 schools on Thursday for the company’s annual “Read to Me” Day. According to a press release from AEP, on one day in November every year, Appalachian Power employees go out to hundreds of elementary schools across West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee. Line mechanics, meter readers, customer call center representatives, power plant workers and engineers all take a children’s book to read to students at the elementary schools.

More than 300 employees read to more than 20,000 students at the schools and left the book with the school as a donation to the school library.

“We all take the same book, and we ask the schools if they’d like for us to come for every elementary school,” Appalachian Power Real Estate employee Lisa Hammock said. “A lot of times, the book is selected based on the author or illustrator if they’re local or if it has something to do with electricity.”

One of the schools that Hammock visited on Thursday was Glade Hill Elementary. She said that she enjoyed visiting Glade Hill because it’s where she went to elementary school herself and her children went to school there as well. The theme for this year was “Never Give Up.”

Employees read the book “The Boy Who Touched the Stars” by José Hernández in honor of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. The autobiography describes the author’s journey as the son of migrant workers from Mexico to becoming an astronaut on the Space Shuttle Discovery.

-For more information see the Nov. 27 edition of the Smith Mountain Eagle-

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.