Stephannie Mills

Franklin County Sheriff’s Office Major Justin Sigmon is shown congratulating Deputy Stephannie Mills on Wednesday, Dec. 23, for receiving an award from WoodmenLife. 

WoodmenLife and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office would like to recognize Deputy Stephannie Mills for her commitment to our community for the month of December!

Twas a couple of days before Christmas and all through the county all the creatures were stirring to find the perfect gift. What is the perfect gift THIS year, the year where everything isn’t as it was. It wasn't in boxes or bags or wrapped in glittering foil but was the gift of kindness and love and peace and often this gift is found in the people that watch out for us and take care of us every day. This is the story of Deputy Stephannie Mills. 

First and foremost, she is a deputy of the Franklin Count Sheriff’s office and has a multitude of responsibilities to our community, but she is also involved in so many OTHER things. For example, I worked directly with her in the Virginia Rules Education Course, which for the past five years prior to 2020, was provided through a grant from the Attorney General’s office. This is where several deputies work with a group of approximately 40 children from our community for a week during the summer. The course is to help those young adults better understand how to work together, how to respect each other and watch out for some of the not so niceness of the world.

Now, this is not a simple camp, and a lot of thought and attention is put into orchestrating this event. The safety and well being of the children is always at the top of the list while making sure the material is helpful and speaks to the needs of children growing up in this day and time along with making sure they are fed, have a good time, and get to build friendships with other young people. But if that isn’t enough let me tell you about a few other things she does. 

She is a resource officer at the Benjamin Franklin Middle School and provides an additional bridge between the young people and law enforcement, showing every day how she is there to listen and lend a hand. While she has been doing this a while, this year has been an exceptional challenge for our students and teachers and Deputy Mills is still there helping and reaching out to the students even with the new learning systems that were put into place due to COVID. 

Deputy Mills is a car seat technician, helping young parents know how to protect their bundle of joy in a car. Those directions aren’t always the easiest, but she helps to take the guess work out of an already stressful time. She also works with Franklin County Public School's Transportation Department, helping to protect special needs children when their car seats are in buses, vans and vehicles. She is a crime prevention specialist, working with businesses to evaluate their locations along with providing classes for the community to better protect themselves and others.

And if all of this wasn’t enough, she also works with Project Lifesaver. This program is for our citizens that wander due to diseases such as alzheimer’s or autism. Because of this program, we are able to quickly locate those that wander. Currently, there are approximately 40 clients in Franklin County ages range from 2 years to 104 years old. Due to COVID the task of managing the battery changes, delivering supplies, and client check-in’s have become one of Deputy Mills priorities. 

The above is just a fraction of what she does for our community and for that, Deputy Mills has definitely earned a permanent place on the extra special good list. When you meet her the light of caring and kindness radiate from her and she is dedicated to her community and taking care of all of us. On behalf and myself and WoodmenLife, thank you Deputy Stephannie Mills for all that you do to help our community be a better place!

Read more stories in the current issue of the Smith Mountain Eagle newspaper. Pick up a copy or subscribe at www.smithmountaineagle.com/subscriber_services to view articles in the print and/or e-edition version.

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